Snøhetta Produces Conceptual Renderings of a Full-Scale Ship Tunnel in Norway

Oslo-based Architecture and Design Office Snøhetta has produced a conceptual design for the world’s first full-scale ship tunnel. The tunnel is supposed to link two fjords on both sides of the Stad Peninsula in Norway, keeping the ships safe while passing through the “most exposed, most dangerous” area of Norway’s coast. The Norwegian Coastal Administration has released Snøhetta’s conceptual renderings, in efforts to gain acceptance for the project which is still in the feasibility stage.

mage © Norwegian Coastal Administration/Snøhetta

The Stad Ship Tunnel will be 1.7-kilometer-long, 36-meter-wide, and 49-meter-tall, making it suitable for use by large boat-like cruise ships, sailboats, and coastal steamers. It is expected to be used by 70 to 120 ships per day. Snøhetta has collaborated with Olav Olsen of Norwegian consulting firm Norconsult and created the design of the entrances using materials from the surrounding context. The archways will be made of wire-cut and blasted stones, influenced in their design by the regions’ natural landscape.

Image © Norwegian Coastal Administration/Snøhetta

As matter of fact, the idea of a tunnel through the Stad Peninsula is far from new. It has been there since the 1870s, and possibly since the time of the Vikings. The project is expected to cost NOK 2.3 billion, which is equivalent to $270 million, and take about 3-4 years of construction. If granted permission in time, the construction works shall commence in 2019.

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