Noritaka Minami has photographed the Nakagin Capsule Tower in a series he calls ‘1972.’ The structure was open in 1972 as an ideal for housing in the 21st century. The structure is composed of a system of capsules. These modular parts allow for growth over time. They were also meant to last for only 25 years, but in the 40 years of their existence, they haven’t been refurbished, replaced, nor regenerated. Designed by Kisho Kurokawa as the future of housing, the idea never really caught on.

Courtesy of Noritaka Minami

Minami’s photographs at first seem nostalgic, a reminiscence of what was thought to be futuristic, but actually they are photographs of what essentially is a time capsule.

Courtesy of Noritaka Minami

The porthole windows, minimalistic design, built-in furnishings and fixtures remind me of an aircraft or a ship of sorts.

Courtesy of Noritaka Minami

Minami’s photographs offer a clash of eras. At first glance for someone who is not familiar with Kurokawa’s Nakagin Capsule Tower, the photographs seem to be of the past or give off a vintage vibe. Then at closer glance, you start noticing the brand-new Apple computer on the desk, the view outside, the buildings around it, and the more time you take to see the details, the more you see the clash between the envisioned future and the actual reality.

By Aiysha Alsane

Courtesy of Noritaka Minami

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