The archetypical form of the cut jewel is one of the most iconic and recognizable in contemporary culture. Composed of varying numbers of facets and vertices, they offer an element of rigid control, while existing in the unpredictability of the real world. Facets can be controlled, but interior structures and inclusions in the base material define variances in how light interacts with and through the forms. This leads to two stones of identical cuts offering vastly different qualities and appearances. Indeed some stones, such as emeralds, are defined and authenticated by these inclusions and variances. If you see a perfect emerald, either the wearer is royalty, or it is lab-grown.

Arch2o Osmosis  Arik Levy - 3

Courtesy of  Arik Levy

The artist Arik Levy has created the interactive installation titled ‘Osmosis’ based on this principle of non-linearity. Displayed at the London Design Museum, the work depends on user interaction in a black room + screen. The vertices of the base jewel are relocated and distorted by how the visitor interacts with the room and its sensors.

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