Pebble-shaped pavilions of Monte Carlo Affine Design

In the heart of Monte-Carlo, Monaco, five unique pebble-shaped pavilions are designed to form a very exceptional shopping experience. The futuristic-looking structures, designed by architect Richard Martinet, of Affine Design, offer customers a head-to-toe fashion and accessories space. These temporary spaces were brought to the city as a part of the renovation and development projects of place du casino and as a temporary host until the restoration of its hotel and meeting halls. For the next four years, until the renovation project is completed in 2018, the pavilions will house 21 luxury stores.

Courtesy of Richard Martinet, Affine Design

Courtesy of Richard Martinet, Affine Design

Located between the Avenue de la Costa and the Place du Casino, the five Pavilions are placed in a pedestrian-only zone. They are linked by a river-like path directing visitors from one pebble-like structure to the next while taking them through the shops they house. Surrounded by many tall trees within the Boulingrins gardens, the pavilions’ assembly required the relocation of 90 plants; these will be kept in a nursery to be planted back in their original location after the project is finished and the pavilions are dismounted.

Courtesy of Richard Martinet, Affine Design

Courtesy of Richard Martinet, Affine Design

Due to the temporary nature of the pavilions, they were designed and structured allowing for easy disassembly and relocation. However, since the current location in Monte-Carlo has a slope of 8% “each doorway has been constructed at a different altimetry, so, when they are moved, the terrain on which they are reconstructed will have to be changed to resemble the land on which they were first built” states the architect. Each of the five pavilions consists of two independent shells. The first is the inner framework element which allows for an easy dismantling and reassembling of the project. The other is the outer formal surface made up of off-white aluminum panels. The structures range in size from 220 – 600 square meters each, with a maximum height of ten meters. The pavilions contrast with the surrounding language of architecture, yet they symbolize an echo-friendly design approach which is what all cities, including Monte-Carlo, are aiming for.

By:Ala’ Abuhasan

Courtesy of Richard Martinet, Affine Design

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