This proposed technology hub will be an innovative, multidisciplinary space. It should be of the highest Architectural quality, create a meaningful presence in Melbourne, and offer a museum on the history of computing and related technologies and start-up spaces for fledgling technology companies.

Courtesy of Mitchell Gow, Kelvin Karel and Rovi Lau

Courtesy of Mitchell Gow, Kelvin Karel and Rovi Lau

A prominent site has been reserved for the building at the northeast corner of Melbourne’s CBD. The site is a meeting point of natural, academic, and commercial uses. It is within the CBD and a short walk from vibrant Chinatown, yet is adjacent to the Victorian landscaping of the Carlton Gardens and the heritage listed Royal Exhibition Building. It is nearby to the State Library, Melbourne Museum, and the Royal Society of Victoria. It is between RMIT and the Australian Catholic University. The selection of site location seeks to create synergistic opportunities for the museum and startup space by having startup companies located near each other, being nearby to significant education and research institutions, and being within the CBD.

Courtesy of Mitchell Gow, Kelvin Karel and Rovi Lau

Courtesy of Mitchell Gow, Kelvin Karel and Rovi Lau

The following design and development principles below should be accounted for:
● Outstanding, engaging, and original design that has potential to become a landmark and a symbol of digital technology in Australia.
● Place making that is sustainable from economic, social, and environmental perspectives.
● Strong connections to the Melbourne CBD and nearby green space, and increased permeability of the site by acknowledging the historical laneway approach to urban fabric in the Melbourne CBD.
● Respond to the existing constraints on the site such as the City Loop tunnel and provide for existing and anticipated built form in the area.
● Consider design solutions by creating script(s) that will solve your site problems and challenges. Though this process incorporate a bespoke workflow that utilizes targeted digital tools in the development and in particular explore responsive/reactive architecture solutions.

Courtesy of Mitchell Gow, Kelvin Karel and Rovi Lau

Courtesy of Mitchell Gow, Kelvin Karel and Rovi Lau

The program is currently broadly outlined as three types of complementary uses: a technology museum, start-up spaces, and associated outdoor areas:
●The museum should create a space where the history of computing and related technologies can be celebrated and acknowledged. It should accommodate a permanent exhibition and also have provision for special displays, installations, and events. There should be provision for educational functions that make use of the museum collection and expertise of staff and other building occupants.
●The start-up space is a location where new technology companies can be supported and mentored. Companies should have access to private and shared areas. They will also need access to a variety of services.
●The outdoor areas should be designed subject to the principles in the section above. Further, they should provide working and display locations for the museum and start-up space. Circulation and security aspects must be considered.

Courtesy of Mitchell Gow, Kelvin Karel and Rovi Lau

Courtesy of Mitchell Gow, Kelvin Karel and Rovi Lau

Melbourne School of Design | University of Melbourne

NSpace – Mitchell Gow, Kelvin Karel and Rovi Lau

Tutors: Suleiman Alhadidi & Geoff Kimm

Arch2o has received this project from our readers in order to participate in the Students week 7 event, you may submit your own work for publication in the Students Week 8 by sending it to igraduate(at)arch2o.com

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