Get ready, because the future is here. Nokia has recently released technical drawings and specs to the public for the purpose of enabling individuals to 3D-print cases for their flagship device, the Lumia 820.

Having long been a staple in many architecture schools (by long, I still mean less than a decade), 3D-printing is at the forefront of the rapid prototyping mindset and ethos. And the technology hasn’t relegated itself only to academics. In recent years companies such as Boeing have incorporated a scaled version of 3D-printing to produce components for their airplanes, while doctors are capable now of 3D-printing human organs, using personal cells instead of ink.

Some have speculated on this possible future, now seemingly spearheaded into reality by Nokia’s decision. Such a future would be one where many simple- perhaps in future, more complex- items and products, the design files are released online, or sold with a decrypter file, to be input into the buyer’s personal 3D printer to be built up in the comfort of the living room or office. Good bye shipping time woes. Although now there will be drying/curing time woes. That considered, the price of progress seems rather small.