Moscow Circus School Entry – TRIPINNACLE

Tripinnacle (Tri – Pinnacle) or Three Peaks, represents not only the buildings form of three tent like peaks, but is derived from the buildings program and organizational layout for the three peaks of success in acrobatics, theater, and most fields of art in general. These three program types are education, practice, and social activities.

Courtesy of Michael Pryor, Pavlina Vardoulaki, Georgi Kunchev & Nickolas Batis

Courtesy of Michael Pryor, Pavlina Vardoulaki, Georgi Kunchev & Nickolas Batis

Upon the site, program is laid out similar to a Venn diagram where the moment in which the three program types collide becomes the buildings primary circulation zone with a grand atrium connecting all the floors. This programmatic arrangement is influenced by the notion of the three ring circus in which three performance areas are used simultaneously for different acts under a singular enclosure marked by three tent peaks.

Courtesy of Michael Pryor, Pavlina Vardoulaki, Georgi Kunchev & Nickolas Batis

Courtesy of Michael Pryor, Pavlina Vardoulaki, Georgi Kunchev & Nickolas Batis

Tripinnacle emulates these performances in terms of multiple zones of the building becoming activated for different acts (programs) which are essentially part of the same show (career). Tripinnacle’s physical appearance and aesthetic is derived from traditional circus tent iconisism along with the bold statements of Moscow’s feature architectural pieces, specifically its cathedrals. Like the Saint Basil’s Cathedral, Tripinnacle fits its context by not fitting it. Meaning its aesthetic goal is to stand out as a spectacle to its surrounds. In the way that a circus and theatrical performance is a show of wonder, Tripinnacle is the grand performance piece of its contextual neighbors. The primary inspiration from the tents and cathedrals are the tops, peaks, domes, and pinnacles which for the most part serve primarily for aesthetic and iconic agendas.

Courtesy of Michael Pryor, Pavlina Vardoulaki, Georgi Kunchev & Nickolas Batis

Courtesy of Michael Pryor, Pavlina Vardoulaki, Georgi Kunchev & Nickolas Batis

Tripinnacle takes the primitive geometry of the pinnacle, a cone, and rather than use them as empty space at the top of a structure they are flipped onto their sides creating horizontally elongated cones more suitable to the horizontality of the site. These three cones are then deformed and cut for site restrictions, entry, and programmatic requirements to establish the buildings form. The form is then cut up into a series of interwoven structural ribs whose architectural language represents the spiraling of Moscow cathedral tops and the striped patchwork of fabric which makes a circus tents membrane.

Courtesy of Michael Pryor, Pavlina Vardoulaki, Georgi Kunchev & Nickolas Batis

Courtesy of Michael Pryor, Pavlina Vardoulaki, Georgi Kunchev & Nickolas Batis

Just as the Saint Basil’s Cathedral becomes an icon for Moscow and a striped tent becomes the icon for a circus, Tripinnacle is the new icon for a circus school with a form and programmatic layout which remains unique to its functions and context. Tripinnacle is Moscow’s newest lead in the architectural theater.

Team Members: DesignMorphine (Michael Pryor, Pavlina Vardoulaki, Georgi Kunchev, Nickolas Batis)

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