The new King Abdullah II House of Culture & Art designed by Zaha Hadid Architects is an expression of temporality and the forces of nature. The major volume of the Centre appears as a large block of hewn stone. If one were to imagine scaling that block down to the size of a human and then exposing it to running water for perhaps a millennium, the incursions into the facade would be the result.

Courtesy of  Zaha Hadid Architects

Zaha Hadid Architects state that the major form giving influence behind this building was the ancient city of Petra- featuring phenomenal examples of rock hewn architecture (meaning architecture which is carved from rock faces, not compiled of cut rock!) and the action of weather erosion upon this ancient site.

Courtesy of  Zaha Hadid Architects

They describe the architecture as being guided by erosion, with the volumes left behind housing the program- which includes a 1600-seat concert theatre, 400-seat theatre, educational centre, rehearsal rooms, and galleries. The interior exists as a continuous, multi-level spaces which cuts through the building, as water would flow- slowly shaping the spaces.

Courtesy of  Zaha Hadid Architects

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