Irons For The Ages, Flowers For The Day

Artist Li Hongbo known for using paper for his artistic pursuits, has created a sculpture titled “ Irons For The Ages, Flowers For The Day ” which is currently installed at SCAD Museum of Art till January 24, 2016.

Courtesy of Li Hongbo – Photography: SCAD Museum of Art

The Chinese Han dynasty (206 B.C. – 220 A.D.) holds the record for the oldest known fragments of paper. China is known for its traditional paper toys and paper sculptures that tell stories through their form. Fascinated and intrigued with this aspect of his culture, the artist explored the possibilities of the material. He uses paper to create shape-shifting sculptures which captivate the viewers. A thin vulnerable material transforms into a masterpiece.

courtesy of Li hongbo

Courtesy of Li Hongbo – Photography: SCAD Museum of Art

The sculpture shows a floral arrangement in various colours. Layers of honeycombed paper have been formed into one endless sculpture by using an adhesive . Upon closer inspection however, something much deeper is revealed. The sculpture is capable of twisting, bending and stretching, and it folds into guns- symbols of weapons and war.

Courtesy of Li Hongbo – Photography: SCAD Museum of Art

Flowers give way to forms of guns. Li Hongbo wishes to show the “damage” hidden behind the vibrant flowers signifying that weapons are not only for self-defence. Captivated by the vibrancy of their desires humans resort to the use of weapons and cause destruction. It seems to be a plea for humanity to recognize the true nature of weapons; to ultimately realize that weapons are not needed.

Courtesy of Li Hongbo – Photography: SCAD Museum of Art

 

By: Surabhi Bhatt , Sahiba Gulati

 

 

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