The winning entry for the Gwanggyo City Centre, a new city to be constructed just south of South Korea’s Seoul, exists as a sort of hanging gardens-meets-metropolis. Designed as a fully self-sufficient city for up to 77,000 inhabitants, its nodal ‘hill’ structures concentrate residency, work, and play facilities in one interactive center to build a sense of community while reducing dependance on train or auto transportation.

 

Courtes of MVRDV

Within each ‘hill’ and internal irrigation system stores extra water from the buildings and channels it to ‘planters’ containing box hedges, which ring each floor. These improve ventilation by filtering air as it passes through as well as reducing energy usage through evaporative cooling while the internal irrigation system reduces water usage through the negation of need for an independent source of irrigation.

Courtes of MVRDV

The concentric ringed floors step in as the building rises (or outwards if looking from top, down). MVRDV states ‘By pushing these rings outwards, every part of the program receives a terrace for outdoor life’.

Courtes of MVRDV

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