Gallery interior into a ship hull with blue paint

A wooden chair, a metal buoy, tiffany blue paint, and nineteen antique canvases gathered from flea markets, old cellars and junkyards across Rome were used by Davide D’elia to turn the interior of the Ex Elettrofonica gallery into a surreal space. The artist created astonishing scenery; what once was a plain room was beautifully transformed into a ship’s hull. D’elia had covered half the room’s walls, floor, and art pieces with the blue anti-fouling paint (Antivegetativa) and in the process he divided all elements of the space into two parts.

Courtesy of Davide D’elia

Courtesy of Davide D’elia

The used anti-foiling paint is usually used to cover ancient ship’s hulls to block any animal and plant organisms and defeat any unwanted life. The London-based artist describes his work saying that: “from the process of immersion of the objects in the paint stems a reflection on a stretch of common history, that of things, and this gives rise to another, much deeper one, on what remains beyond the end of material. Through the process of the cancellation of natural processes, ‘antivegetativa’ is an experiment in halting nature’s physicality, as well as the passing of time.”

Courtesy of Davide D’elia

Courtesy of Davide D’elia

By:Ala’ Abuhasan

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