The problem with installations is what happens to them after they are used. Pavilions often have an expiration date, constructed for a certain event or competition, and then taken down and discarded. Leaving us with only photographic representations on the Internet and articles about what they were like. Before you know it, something else is put in it’s place and that too is being taken down. Despite this structure’s temporary nature, it aims to make a lasting impact- inspiring British youth though music.

 Courtesy of Pernilla & Asif

The fragmented and chaotic façade of the Coca-Cola Beatbox illustrate motion and energy, honoring the rebellious independent lives of today’s youth. Designers Pernilla and Asif wanted to create a piece of architecture that was more than a shelter, being also a musical instrument that can be played, allowing human interaction while providing music throughout the entire Olympic park. Ideally when people approach and touch the interior cushioned walls of the pavilion a series of different pre-recorded sounds will be produced so the users can use their creativity and remix their own tunes.

It’s refreshing to see the architects hold their ground and the integrity of this pavilion by having no visible Coca-Cola logos, instead keeping the advertizing to a minimum and simply using the brands iconic red and white color scheme. The building will also take advantage of green technology as well as being made of recycled materials promoting sustainability. After the event is over, all the materials will be reused in later projects or recycled in accordance to Coca-Cola’s 0% landfill policy. The Olympics is a prime example of an event that inspires architects to push themselves and provides the opportunity to transcend cultural boundaries, encouraging a sense of international unity and an environment enjoyed by all.

Courtesy of Pernilla & Asif

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