The amazing vision of Arne Quinze is one that continues to feel new every time I see his works. Camille, located in Rouen, France is a sculptural shelter/ walk-under that spans the Boieldieu bridge over the river Seine.

‘When I visited Rouen and got to see the Boieldieu bridge for the first time, I immediately understood the bridge had to generate social interaction. My installations are all about bringing people back together and connecting them. This public art installation for the bridge over the Seine has the same aim. Inhabitants from the left side will meet inhabitants from the right side underneath the entangled wooden slats.’-Arne Quinze


© Arne Quinze

The hilarious thing to me is that I have been under the impression for some time now that this was a wonderful idea that would probably not get built. HA! There’s French appreciation of a good thing for you! You see, I am from the US and I’m pretty sure most building councils here would reject something so seemingly delicate and (forgive me) haphazard. The brilliant thing is, while appearing haphazard, the constructions of Arne Quinze can almost be read as corporeal structural diagrams. Every piece of wood is located where it is and fixed to what it is, all striving for the common goal of defying gravity. I am reminded of how convoluted our own bodies can appear at first glance. Several of the cranial nerves follow strange twisted paths, up and down and around before reaching their destinations and objectives. It has been likened to opening up the walls of a Victorian building that has been retrofitted over-and over. Things are not as simple as they could be, by no means, but therein lies the fascination for the observer.

© Arne Quinze

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