Grove at Grand Bay, Miami, Florida
Towering over Coconut Grove, Bjarke Ingels Group’s Grove at Grand Bay, was finally completed this year. The residential project, which is located in Miami’s oldest inhabited neighborhood, gives a refreshing effect to it, with its dynamic form.

Grove at Grand Bay,Courtesy of BIG-[ Bjarke Ingels Group ]

Grove at Grand Bay,Courtesy of BIG-[ Bjarke Ingels Group ]

Bjarke Ingels derived his twisted form from all the necessities and concerns of the project. They start with the narrow site and its sloping grade. There is, also, the 20-story limit in the Grove. That is in addition to the FEMA flood regulations which requires the ground floor to be 13 feet above grade. To get over the height limit issue, the project was made into two towers, but then there was the problem of one blocking the view from the other. After multiple three-dimensional studies, that twisted form seemed to provide the best view for both towers. About that Ingels says:  “By creating twisting towers that rise side-by-side but never cross paths, we were able to optimize views, outdoor spaces, and the flexibility of our floor plans while allowing the buildings to interact with one another.”

Grove at Grand Bay,Courtesy of BIG-[ Bjarke Ingels Group ]

Grove at Grand Bay,Courtesy of BIG-[ Bjarke Ingels Group ]

Both towers are twisted by a 38-degree angle. The floor plates from the 3rd to the 17th are rotated three feet. Add to that the 12-foot deep wraparound balconies, and the tower gets its optimized view. After the 17th floor, the rotation stops. Besides being unnecessary, it makes it seem like the tower has finally found its optimum orientation, as Ingels has explained. The final product gives a shape that resembles a splayed deck of cards or the splayed bellows of an accordion.

Grove at Grand Bay,Courtesy of BIG-[ Bjarke Ingels Group ]

Grove at Grand Bay,Courtesy of BIG-[ Bjarke Ingels Group ]

The minimal interior design of the building features neutral colored elements like slated concrete pillars, raw concrete floors, oak tables, and black metal railings that contrast the plain concrete. The neutrality of these elements is countered by the landscape and the colorful murals on the wall, making the interiors feel livelier. The landscape is designed by Raymond Jungles. Jungles, who is originally from Coconut Grove, use 500 trees, 15,000 subtropical plantings, and water features to reflect the neighborhood’s natural setting.

Grove at Grand Bay,Courtesy of BIG-[ Bjarke Ingels Group ]

Grove at Grand Bay,Courtesy of BIG-[ Bjarke Ingels Group ]

Grove at Grand Bay contains 98 residential units, with dual level penthouses on top. It, also, has rooftop pools, spa and fitness center, full-time concierge and butler service, a private dining room for residents and their guests, and a pet spa.

Grove at Grand Bay,Courtesy of BIG-[ Bjarke Ingels Group ]

Grove at Grand Bay,Courtesy of BIG-[ Bjarke Ingels Group ]

Coconut Grove’s twisted towers are expected to be the first residential towers in Florida to achieve a LEED Gold status. It seems that BIG has managed to incorporate pleasure into a functional habitat.

Grove at Grand Bay,Courtesy of BIG-[ Bjarke Ingels Group ]

Grove at Grand Bay,Courtesy of BIG-[ Bjarke Ingels Group ]

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