The Museum of Tomorrow, Rio de Janerio, Brasil

Santiago Calatrava the much celebrated father of projectile structures, would be opening a champagne bottle to mark the opening of the anticipated Museum of Tomorrow in Rio de Janerio, Brasil.

Photo Courtesy: PR

The museum an architectural edifice on its own packs an altogether different story for its existence. Sustainability has by far, in the current day context has been a debatable and quibbled over subject in any practice with each formulating his or her own theory about its generic aspects. This edifice stands as a testimony for progressive upliftment of the lost urban spaces. Considered as one of the desolate and crime ridden areas about a decade ago, this is the first step in revitalizing life into the decayed Port Maravilha neighbourhood near the bay.

Photo Courtesy: Thales Leite

Photo Courtesy: Thales Leite

“The city of Rio de Janeiro is setting an example to the world of how to recover quality urban spaces through drastic intervention and the creation of cultural facilities such as the Museum of Tomorrow”

– Santiago Calatrava

In addition to the copious structure, an addition of plaza creates a more cohesive urban space and reflects the neighbourhood’s progressive transformation.

Photo Courtesy: Thales Leite

Photo Courtesy: Thales Leite

The 18m tall museum has the trademark exposed skeletal cantilever spines the personal touch of Calatrava’s which provides an ethereal view as if the structure is floating away on water like a plant. Few other key features are, the trussed roof has solar installations that move according to the position of the sun minimizing natural energy losses, because of its horizontal tilted nature. Additionally the cooling systems tap deep waters from the Guanabara Bay. Calculation predict a reduction of 40% in energy consumption.

Photo Courtesy: Bernard Lessa

Photo Courtesy: Bernard Lessa

The 5000 sqft exhibition space has been currently adorned with various subjects revolving around the very life of a human being. As one moves through the spaces portraying origins of the planet, 13.7 billion years of geological change, the delve into the flux of matter, followed by the basic symbol of our biological existence the DNA connecting the nervous system of a series of pillars resonating the spiritual identity.

Photo Courtesy: Thales Leite

Photo Courtesy: Thales Leite

At the heart of the museum is a digital replication of Stonehenge in modern terms. 10 tall totems portray our foray into the destructive and merciless side of humankind showing the ruthlessness with which we massacred the nature for the seemingly negligible amount of 7 billions’ greed over the past century. Next exhibit jumps forward in time facilitating each visitor a chance to shape different future, through virtual media.

Photo Courtesy: Bernard Lessa

Photo Courtesy: Bernard Lessa

The overall experience sounds like we experiencing a chains of thought of a much larger entity than the tiny our self. And the versatility of the museum tips it to accommodate conferences or act as a research space.

Photo Courtesy: Bernard Lessa

Photo Courtesy: Bernard Lessa

With sustainability as the key factor the museum achieves revitalization both in literal and psychological terms in this era calamitous chutzpah transforming into being the Archive of Tomorrow.

By: Achyuthan Ramaswamy

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